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  2. Are you familiar with Leafly's wellness wheel? We love it as it sparks understanding about the nature of Cannabis and Hemp wellness. What are your take-away's from using their resource?
  3. We want to start this major discussion thread to curate both "favorite strains" and "favorite dispensaries". Make sure to tell us the city and state so we know where you're coming from. 😉
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  5. MemberSupport

    SAFE Banking Act

    We are excited to report that the bipartisan SAFE Banking Act continues to have the support of Democratic leadership in the U.S. House of Representatives and may still become law during this session of Congress! Late Monday night, the Democrats in the House released a new, scaled-down COVID relief package, which they are calling HEROES Act 2.0. In spite of repeated Republican jabs about the inclusion of the SAFE Banking Act in the Democrats' original HEROES Act, Democratic leadership refused to jettison the legislation. The inclusion of SAFE is significant, as there now seems to be momentum toward passing a relief package prior to the election — and possibly within the week. CTF and its allies continue to work the phones, emails, and texts in order to increase the chances that the final COVID relief bill will include the SAFE Banking Act. We will keep you posted as events unfold.
  6. We are now 33 days out from the US Presidential election and all the states' voting on ballot issues. This is a critical time for our C+H (Cannabis and Hemp) industries and voting results will tell us a lot about even greater momentum for all the industries and companies which we serve. What you need to know are the top 4 C+H legalization trends and how they will impact industry growth and the speed by which this growth will happen. Trend #1 - The MORE Act of 2019 will have a huge affect on our country. The House Judiciary Committee has approved a bill Wednesday that would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2019, or MORE Act, passed 24-10 after more than two hours of debate. It now heads to the full House. The bill would remove marijuana from the list of federally controlled substances, allow states to set their own marijuana policy and require federal courts to expunge prior convictions for marijuana offenses. A 5% tax on marijuana products would also establish a trust fund for programs designed to help people disproportionately impacted by the "war on drugs," including job training and treatment for substance abuse. "For far too long, we have treated marijuana as a criminal justice problem instead of a matter of personal choice and public health. Whatever one's views on the use of marijuana for recreational or medicinal purposes, arresting, prosecuting and incarcerating users at the federal level is unwise and unjust," House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler said in his opening statement. This bill is being sponsored by Kamala Harris and the legislation intends to right the wrong of those individuals penalized for non-violent Cannabis crimes. But the impact will go much, much further in ensuring that Cannabis is removed as a Schedule 1 drug and that Cannabis becomes legal at the Federal level which it is not currently. By passing this bill and legalizing Cannabis at the Federal level then banks can finally support all of the C+H businesses that have been struggling without banking industry support especially in areas such as e-commerce, major US and other stock markets, institutional investing, etc. This bill is a HUGE opportunity for our C+H industries around the world as well as in North America! Trend #2 - New Jersey as a Middle Atlantic States Tipping Point With New Jersey about to vote on their Cannabis Recreation legalization on November 3rd, 2020, the state will become (we predict) a major positive tipping point for all other Middle Atlantic states who have not passed a Recreational Cannabis bill, to do so. This state will then open the flood gates for a new 9 Billion dollar market opportunity across states such as Rhode Island and Connecticut (New England states) as well as New York, Delaware, Maryland and so on. Trend #3 - South Dakota as a Central and Western States Tipping Point South Dakota is currently one of the most restrictive states in the USA. But if they should pass a medical and recreational bill to allow legalization, this will be another HUGE impetus for other restrictive states in the Central and Western areas of the US. Keep you eyes on this one! Trend #4 - CBD Sales Primed to Move into Grocery Chains The Farm Bill of 2018 legalized the sale of Hemp and CBD in all US states and also for interstate commerce. But the distribution of high quality Hemp-derived CBD sales will now be htting all of the major grocery store chains which will be another high growth opportunity for companies in the CBD markets.
  7. MemberSupport

    Intro To Serious Gardening

    Our wellness community is introducing a new wellness strategy ( and curricula) to help our members explore "serious gardening" content as an adjunct to a broader wellness lifestyle. This may sound strange, so keep reading, to understand why the 3 serious gardening methodologies which we promote are ideal for... 1. Feeding family, friends and neighbors efficiently and consistently 2. For the fun, exercise and collaborative opportunities 3. Exploring the more in-depth topics associated with soil nutrition, human body nutrition, plant power for wellness, etc. Here's the overview: We have been following the best of the best methods, tools and training approaches known in North America since the 70's and 80's for serious backyard gardeners, homesteaders and entry farmers. These "solution sets" are also known as 'packaged methodologies'. We will be featuring the top 3 of them in this herbal apothecary and wellness community in the Spring of 2020. We will also be introducing a major threaded discussion forum re:the "Plant Power" in early Summer, 2020. The 3 serious gardening packaged methodologies that we are announcing today are as follows: I. Square Foot Gardening II. SPIN Farming III. Holistic Management (aka regenerative agriculture) We will be introducing these methods, the tools and the training so that our members can leverage our farm's experiences. We want to help our herbal apothecary and wellness members dissect these programs and self-assess your own circumstances and determine which might be best for you. You may even find that you will want to leverages concepts from all of them. We will cover the above 3 methodologies in the order shown. We are planning on also adding additional packaged methodologies going forward for wellness, homesteading, ranching, etc..
  8. MemberSupport

    In Memorium - Honoring Charlotte

    Charlotte Figi, whose use of cannabidiol, or CBD, to treat her epilepsy helped popularize its medicinal use, died on Tuesday. She was 13. Her death was confirmed by her parents, Paige and Steven Figi, who said the cause was most likely complications related to Covid-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. Charlotte became the face of the medicinal CBD movement when she was 5 years old, after it appeared that taking CBD eased the symptoms of her epilepsy. She had her first seizure when she was 3 months old. Soon after, her parents were told that she had Dravet syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy that starts in infancy. https://www.azfamily.com/news/us_world_news/charlotte-figi-the-girl-who-inspired-a-cbd-movement-has-died-at-age-13/article_12f89e10-515b-5f53-ad91-52dc070acc85.html
  9. MemberSupport

    How to Get Started?

    Our organization focuses on both the Business-To-Business (B2B) and Business-To-Consumer (B2C) market segments. When you look at the international IOS standards which we support AND the additional standards promoted by FOCUS, you are confronted by quite a long list of significant and relevant requirements. Yet, where should we dig in? Plus, what should be our order of priorities? Here's an approach that might work for you. The place to get started, and build practice capabilities is in the areas of risk identification, assessment and management. Working as a team, the firm's management needs to take the lead to make a list of all top risks, noting a description of the risk, the potential business impact and the likelihood of an occurrence. This process can be started very simply and enhanced over time. But, you need to get started and reviewed on a regular monthly basis. A business that gets this done is head and shoulders above one that takes no action! A business which assigns staff to oversee each risk is moving in the right direction. So, with a listing of your company's prioritized risks, you will begin the risk mitigation effort starting with the highest risks first. Of all the risks that a C+H company faces, one that stands above most other risks are those threats associated with the firm's cybersecurity. If your team has not addressed this one, then you need to reassess your list of prioritized risks, again. Take care to get this one dealt with comprehensively and professionally.
  10. MemberSupport

    Open Standards Which We Support

    The Value Chain Management Open Standards which we support include... ISO 22301; International Standard for Business Continuity / Continuity of Operations ISO 9001; International Standard for Quality Management / Quality of Products and Services ISO 27001; International Standard for Security of Communications and Data ISO 45001; International Standard for Health & Safety ISO 29148; International Standard for Systems Life cycle processes and Requirements engineering ISO 16085; International Standard for Risk Management ISO 15504; International Standard for Maturity Modeling
  11. I have found that when it comes to Value Chain Management excellence, there are a number of industry-standards which form a strong foundation. This is especially true for highly regulated industries. I call these standards, "the Big 3". They are as follows: 1.) Requirements Management / Engineering 2.) Business Process Management (BPM) 3.) Product Life-cycle Management (PLM) The Big 3 combine to form highly-structured management systems, practice methodologies and open standards which allow not only the gamut of enterprise functions to work more effectively within the four walls of the enterprise, but also to strengthen all facets of design chain and supply chain activities, functions, roles, etc. Let me give you a quick overview of each of these. Requirements Engineering / Management is a practice which started in the defense industry with the acquisition of highly complex weapon systems as well as in the systems engineering arena where highly complex systems like NASA's Space Shuttle, nuclear reactors and so on where so highly complex and had so many potential areas for failure, that engineers needed a way to validate the end-system with the original specification. This is where the practice of managing "atomic" requirements, came into play. An atomic requirement is a statement of a need that can't be decomposed any further. For instance, if we are talking about a Cannabis greenhouse control system, we can break down the overall management of the greenhouse system into requirement categories and each category will be populated with atomic requirements. I have helped many firms to install requirements management Methods, Tools and Training (MTT) and I am always astounded when we look at the resulting shareholder value which was created by these management system programs! The bottom line is the Requirements Engineering is mission-critical for the Cannabis and Hemp value chain organization because it gives management the ability to quickly get their arms around the most complex of systems, while at the same time, building a platform for rapid business growth. All companies which want to achieve excellence in their market need to get serious about requirements management. Once a company has installed the requisite Requirements Management / Engineering MTT (i.e. their "management system") they can then move to connect up any Business Process Management (BPM) programs that they may have in place... OR kick-off a new management system for BPM. One last note re: Requirements Management... Once a company has successfully installed Requirements Management MTT, they will be able to address Business Rule Management (BRM), but that's a topic of automation for a future BLOG post. Business Process Management (BPM) is where many companies have huge opportunities for growth. The process initially starts with what is called "enterprise mapping" which is a method of business modeling which focuses on business functions, NOT departments! I helped to introduce this methodology at a number of companies which I have worked for and the best known are Boeing Aerospace and PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). After the functional modeling work has been completed, the company will then move right into process modeling and the selection of a process modeling MTT. I championed a hybrid process management MTT while at PwC which integrates functional modeling with process flow diagramming. Once the modeling tasks are complete, then a company will be able to simulate their process flow cycle times and conduct detailed "what-iffing". Once a company has installed these Process Management MTTs they can then move to a requirements definition phase for automating any business process which generates the highlest level of Strategic Shareholder Value. The process management team will produce a list of high-priority business process flows that they would like to automate. Before they begin to do so, they will first need to produce another requirements spec for a Business Process Management (BPM) system which will allow them to deploy automated workflows. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is an enterprise-wide process flow that fully spans all areas of the enterprise associated with products and services and this includes the Design Chain and Supply Chain fuctions which extend beyond the "4 walls of the enterprise" because it links other corporate partners. The core idea behind PLM is that any product moving through the enterprise has a lifecycle "state" associated with it such as "conceptual", "as designed", "as approved", "as manufactured", "retired", "cancelled", etc. All areas of the enterprise can find the latest and greatest files, drawings, and metadata associated with a product. PLM requiree both strong Requirements Management AND Process Management to allow a firm to reap the strategic shareholder value that the corporate investments had in mind to begin with. The returns on investment can be significant. The Big 3 are where Cannabis + Hemp Value Chain organizations need to dig in if they are serious about "burying the competition" and these 3 management systems have the power to form a cohesive and complementary super-system. A super-system which offers the company a sustainable competitve advantage!
  12. We have three industry organizations that we want to tell you about, and then get you excited about the significant business value opportunity in working with us on a variety of Cannabis and Hemp value chain deals. International Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ American Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ Canadian Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ Understanding the C+H Value Chain Mission Each of these organizations help your firm by increasing your industry visibility, respect and buzz that’s needed to be noticed by investors, venture capital firms and angel investors. Cannabis Connect™ PNC Platform This level of industry recognition and thought-leadership is needed to attract the best value chain partners, too. That’s where our Cannabis Connect™ service comes into play. The Cannabis Connect™ Professionals’ Networked Community (PNC) platform service helps your team and you to increase your overall enterprise and product brand visibility, recognition, significantly. We also help you boost your business thought-leadership and customer experience share of minds and hearts. Mission-Critical Competencies: · Identification and execution of important C+H value chain deals. · Attract the attention of Venture Capital firms and Angel investors. · Find Board of Director mentors and business coaches. · Structure Strategic Partnerships and Co-Marketing Deals · Participate in Merger & Acquisition (M&A) discussions, assessments and venture deals. · Understand how your Governance, Risk and Compliance business disciplines attract investors and customers. In essence, we help you to achieve an entirely new level of Cannabis & Hemp (i.e. C+H) Value Chain Excellence! What is C+H Value Chain Excellence? Cannabis & Hemp (C+H) Value Chain Excellence represents the hallmark of business management expertise and work management discipline which governs how we need to engineer, build, manage and sustain all legal C+H value chains around the world. (Read More) We help our members achieve process excellence in an exceedingly complex business environment. We help them to configure value chains with complete control, coordination, communication and collaboration (4 C) practices with all our C+H value chain partners no matter whether they are strategic partners, joint ventures, M&A, joint deals, etc. Our raid-paced and highly regulated business management processes are handled like any highly-regulated pharmaceutical enterprise. We employ advanced Lean Six Sigma practices and tools which help us deal with the value chain challenges which members face. We also leverage Kata scientific thinking and decision-making and the “Drum-Buffer-Robe” Theory of Constraints systems engineering approach made world-renown for manufacturers by Eliyahu Goldblatt. Our C+H Value Chains We all deal with a rapid work pace and short-cycle relays (i.e. the restarting of new Cannabis and Hemp plants from cloning or tissue culturing practices and related problems at each handoff / juncture in our Cannabis and Hemp Value Chain Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)… 1. Indoor / Outdoor Cultivation 2. Special Clean Room Processing 3. CPG Branding 4. Medicinal and Recreational Sales Dispensary 5. Customer Experience Management and Oversight Want a copy of the industry standard enterprise functions map? Join here to get a copy. Why are C+H value chains are so challenging? Multiple manufacturing production “feeds & speeds” Our Cannabis and Hemp value chains are so challenging because of the variety of product strategies which are needed to optimize the production based on these methods: · “Ship-To-Stock” – A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp cultivators to maximize stock. · “Engineer-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp processors to assess their market and product requirements as early in the design process as possible in order to provide product and services for Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) to surprise and delight the customer. · “Configure-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp product design laboratories and processors They assess their market requirements as early in the design process as possible in order to provide product and services for Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) which are capable of surprising and delighting the customer. · “Make-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp processors (for both medicinal and recreational market channels) to minimize excess inventory for branded Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) and Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) held as inventory. · “Demand Pull” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp retail sales dispensaries (for both medicinal and recreational market channels) to minimize excess inventory for branded Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) and Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs). Multiple Service Dimensions Need to Be Optimized We use the well-proven five (5) Service Quality dimensions of the SERVQUAL “RATER” methodology to assess our Cannabis and Hemp operations against these business objectives: 1. Responsiveness 2. Assurance 3. Tangibles 4. Empathy 5. Reliability Applying the Principles The five Lean principles provide a framework for creating an efficient and effective organization. Lean allows managers to discover inefficiencies in their organization and deliver better value to customers. The principles encourage creating better flow in work processes and developing a continuous improvement culture. By practicing all 5 principles, an organization can remain competitive, increase the value delivered to the customers, decrease the cost of doing business, and increase their profitability. We recommend that all Members leverage our value chain methodology which we have founded on lean principles and practices. Our 5-Step C+H Process lays out the key concepts below which come from Partner organizations such as The GEMBA Academy and The Lean Way. We thank them for their contributions to our International, American and Canadian Cannabis and Hemp Value Chain standards bodies. 1. Define Value To better understand the first principle of defining customer value, it is important to understand what value is. Value is what the customer is willing to pay for. It is paramount to discover the actual or latent needs of the customer. Sometimes customers may not know what they want or are unable to articulate it. This is especially common when it comes to novel products or technologies. There are many techniques such as interviews, surveys, demographic information, and web analytics that can help you decipher and discover what customers find valuable. By using these qualitative and quantitative techniques you can uncover what customers want, how they want the product or service to be delivered, and the price that they afford. 2. Map the Value Stream The second Lean principle is identifying and mapping the value stream. In this step, the goal is to use the customer’s value as a reference point and identify all the activities that contribute to these values. Activities that do not add value to the end customer are considered waste. The waste can be broken into two categories: non-valued added but necessary and non-value & unnecessary. The later is pure waste and should be eliminated while the former should be reduced as much as possible. By reducing and eliminating unnecessary processes or steps, you can ensure that customers are getting exactly what they want while at the same time reducing the cost of producing that product or service. 3. Create Flow After removing the wastes from the value stream, the following action is to ensure that the flow of the remaining steps run smoothly without interruptions or delays. Some strategies for ensuring that value-adding activities flow smoothly include: breaking down steps, reconfiguring the production steps, leveling out the workload, creating cross-functional departments, and training employees to be multi-skilled and adaptive. 4. Establish Pull Inventory is considered one of the biggest wastes in any production system. The goal of a pull-based system is to limit inventory and work in process (WIP) items while ensuring that the requisite materials and information are available for a smooth flow of work. In other words, a pull-based system allows for Just-in-time delivery and manufacturing where products are created at the time that they are needed and in just the quantities needed. Pull-based systems are always created from the needs of the end customers. By following the value stream and working backwards through the production system, you can ensure that the products produced will be able to satisfy the needs of customers. 5. Pursue Perfection Wastes are prevented through the achievement of the first four steps: 1) identifying value, 2) mapping value stream, 3) creating flow, and 4) adopting a pull system. However, the fifth step of pursuing perfection is the most important among them all. It makes Lean thinking and continuous process improvement a part of the organizational culture. Every employee should strive towards perfection while delivering products based on the customer needs. The company should be a learning organization and always find ways to get a little better each and every day.
  13. We have three industry organizations that we want to tell you about, and then get you excited about the significant business value opportunity in working with us on a variety of Cannabis and Hemp value chain deals. International Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ American Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ Canadian Association of Cannabis + Hemp Value Chains™ Understanding the C+H Value Chain Mission Each of these organizations help your firm by increasing your industry visibility, respect and buzz that’s needed to be noticed by investors, venture capital firms and angel investors. Cannabis Connect™ PNC Platform This level of industry recognition and thought-leadership is needed to attract the best value chain partners, too. That’s where our Cannabis Connect™ service comes into play. The Cannabis Connect™ Professionals’ Networked Community (PNC) platform service helps your team and you to increase your overall enterprise and product brand visibility, recognition, significantly. We also help you boost your business thought-leadership and customer experience share of minds and hearts. Mission-Critical Competencies: · Identification and execution of important C+H value chain deals. · Attract the attention of Venture Capital firms and Angel investors. · Find Board of Director mentors and business coaches. · Structure Strategic Partnerships and Co-Marketing Deals · Participate in Merger & Acquisition (M&A) discussions, assessments and venture deals. · Understand how your Governance, Risk and Compliance business disciplines attract investors and customers. In essence, we help you to achieve an entirely new level of Cannabis & Hemp (i.e. C+H) Value Chain Excellence! What is C+H Value Chain Excellence? Cannabis & Hemp (C+H) Value Chain Excellence represents the hallmark of business management expertise and work management discipline which governs how we need to engineer, build, manage and sustain all legal C+H value chains around the world. (Read More) We help our members achieve process excellence in an exceedingly complex business environment. We help them to configure value chains with complete control, coordination, communication and collaboration (4 C) practices with all our C+H value chain partners no matter whether they are strategic partners, joint ventures, M&A, joint deals, etc. Our raid-paced and highly regulated business management processes are handled like any highly-regulated pharmaceutical enterprise. We employ advanced Lean Six Sigma practices and tools which help us deal with the value chain challenges which members face. We also leverage Kata scientific thinking and decision-making and the “Drum-Buffer-Robe” Theory of Constraints systems engineering approach made world-renown for manufacturers by Eliyahu Goldblatt. Our C+H Value Chains We all deal with a rapid work pace and short-cycle relays (i.e. the restarting of new Cannabis and Hemp plants from cloning or tissue culturing practices and related problems at each handoff / juncture in our Cannabis and Hemp Value Chain Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)… 1. Indoor / Outdoor Cultivation 2. Special Clean Room Processing 3. CPG Branding 4. Medicinal and Recreational Sales Dispensary 5. Customer Experience Management and Oversight Want a copy of the industry standard enterprise functions map? Join here to get a copy. Why are C+H value chains are so challenging? Multiple manufacturing production “feeds & speeds” Our Cannabis and Hemp value chains are so challenging because of the variety of product strategies which are needed to optimize the production based on these methods: · “Ship-To-Stock” – A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp cultivators to maximize stock. · “Engineer-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp processors to assess their market and product requirements as early in the design process as possible in order to provide product and services for Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) to surprise and delight the customer. · “Configure-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp product design laboratories and processors They assess their market requirements as early in the design process as possible in order to provide product and services for Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) which are capable of surprising and delighting the customer. · “Make-To-Order” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp processors (for both medicinal and recreational market channels) to minimize excess inventory for branded Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) and Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs) held as inventory. · “Demand Pull” - A commonly employed production strategy used by Cannabis & Hemp retail sales dispensaries (for both medicinal and recreational market channels) to minimize excess inventory for branded Consumer-Packaged Goods (CPGs) and Stock-Keeping Units (SKUs). Multiple Service Dimensions Need to Be Optimized We use the well-proven five (5) Service Quality dimensions of the SERVQUAL “RATER” methodology to assess our Cannabis and Hemp operations against these business objectives: 1. Responsiveness 2. Assurance 3. Tangibles 4. Empathy 5. Reliability Applying the Principles The five Lean principles provide a framework for creating an efficient and effective organization. Lean allows managers to discover inefficiencies in their organization and deliver better value to customers. The principles encourage creating better flow in work processes and developing a continuous improvement culture. By practicing all 5 principles, an organization can remain competitive, increase the value delivered to the customers, decrease the cost of doing business, and increase their profitability. We recommend that all Members leverage our value chain methodology which we have founded on lean principles and practices. Our 5-Step C+H Process lays out the key concepts below which come from Partner organizations such as The GEMBA Academy and The Lean Way. We thank them for their contributions to our International, American and Canadian Cannabis and Hemp Value Chain standards bodies. 1. Define Value To better understand the first principle of defining customer value, it is important to understand what value is. Value is what the customer is willing to pay for. It is paramount to discover the actual or latent needs of the customer. Sometimes customers may not know what they want or are unable to articulate it. This is especially common when it comes to novel products or technologies. There are many techniques such as interviews, surveys, demographic information, and web analytics that can help you decipher and discover what customers find valuable. By using these qualitative and quantitative techniques you can uncover what customers want, how they want the product or service to be delivered, and the price that they afford. 2. Map the Value Stream The second Lean principle is identifying and mapping the value stream. In this step, the goal is to use the customer’s value as a reference point and identify all the activities that contribute to these values. Activities that do not add value to the end customer are considered waste. The waste can be broken into two categories: non-valued added but necessary and non-value & unnecessary. The later is pure waste and should be eliminated while the former should be reduced as much as possible. By reducing and eliminating unnecessary processes or steps, you can ensure that customers are getting exactly what they want while at the same time reducing the cost of producing that product or service. 3. Create Flow After removing the wastes from the value stream, the following action is to ensure that the flow of the remaining steps run smoothly without interruptions or delays. Some strategies for ensuring that value-adding activities flow smoothly include: breaking down steps, reconfiguring the production steps, leveling out the workload, creating cross-functional departments, and training employees to be multi-skilled and adaptive. 4. Establish Pull Inventory is considered one of the biggest wastes in any production system. The goal of a pull-based system is to limit inventory and work in process (WIP) items while ensuring that the requisite materials and information are available for a smooth flow of work. In other words, a pull-based system allows for Just-in-time delivery and manufacturing where products are created at the time that they are needed and in just the quantities needed. Pull-based systems are always created from the needs of the end customers. By following the value stream and working backwards through the production system, you can ensure that the products produced will be able to satisfy the needs of customers. 5. Pursue Perfection Wastes are prevented through the achievement of the first four steps: 1) identifying value, 2) mapping value stream, 3) creating flow, and 4) adopting a pull system. However, the fifth step of pursuing perfection is the most important among them all. It makes Lean thinking and continuous process improvement a part of the organizational culture. Every employee should strive towards perfection while delivering products based on the customer needs. The company should be a learning organization and always find ways to get a little better each and every day.
  14. MemberSupport

    What is TOC?

    TOC (Theory of Constraints) A concept advocated by Eliyahu Goldratt, which is the theoretical base of supply chain management. TOC is a model that explains the impact on profitability from decision-making by a supply chain in terms of time. TOC is also a method of managing bottlenecks. The "TOC (Theory of Constraints)", which was developed by Eliyahu Goldratt, is a method of increasing throughput by managing "constraints" (bottlenecks). It is a concept that serves as the theoretical base of supply chain management and a model that explains the relationship of variables in business as to how cash flow-based profitability is affected by decision-making in the supply chain concerning business processes in terms of time. As a metaphoric explanation, let's use the example of "a group hiking", to describe the management of improving throughput by using the TOC. Using the example of hiking, I'll try to think about the management by which a team leader can let all the members (operations) reach the destination (increase throughput) as soon as possible. Suppose that the team leader does not know physical capacity of all of the team members. Seeing what happens for a little while after starting hiking, the team leader will be able to find out who is the slowest member, i.e. the bottleneck. The interval between the person who is the bottleneck and the person who walks before him will get wider and the interval between the bottleneck person and the person who walks behind him will get narrower. Since the bottleneck person will get slower and slower if they continue to walk this way, place the bottleneck person at the front of the group to make all the other members keep pace (synchronize) with the bottleneck person. By doing so, the group does not spread out and the speed of the bottleneck person increases a little bit, allowing the speed (throughput) of the whole group to increase by increasing the speed of the bottleneck person. By reducing the burden carried by the bottleneck person and by cheering him on to increase his capacity, the speed (throughput) of the whole group will increase. The important concept here is to increase the overall speed not by making all of the members exercise at the same capacity but by making improvements focusing on the capacity of one or two bottleneck persons. If the speed of the whole group increases, there may be other bottleneck members who decrease the overall speed. But if you repeat the same process for the new bottleneck persons as well then the overall speed (throughput) will get faster and faster. Keep repeating this process until no new bottleneck persons appear. After all, it is necessary for a supply chain to make continuous improvements until the limit of throughput is reached. When looking at the word "TOC", bottlenecks (constraints) may appear to be the most important concepts. However, the concept of synchronization has a bigger impact on the theory. Taken with kind permission from the book: "Understand Supply Chain Management through 100 words" by Zenjiro Imaoka. Published by KOUGYOUCHOUSAKAI
  15. MemberSupport

    Value Chain Integration and Strategic Value Savings?

    Usually, the areas that generate the greatest long-term savings are the adoption of Value Chain Management (VCM) and Sourcing best practices. The best way to achieve these savings is to use well-structured VCM and Sourcing methodologies that pursue opportunities in phases, starting with the easiest and most opportunistic and rewarding areas first. The strategic shareholder value associated with an Agile / Lean program methodology addresses the core concept areas depicted above. These help any Cannabis and Hemp organization with the Methods, t=Tools and Training (MTT) needed to transform any firm who has the motivation to help change the status quo and move the company to an entirely new level of organization and profitability. NOTE: Make sure to read our definition of TOC (Theory of Constraints) which is shown as the gray-colored circle, above. The definition is found in our March 31st 2020 BLOG.
  16. MemberSupport

    International

  17. This article has a wealth of value chain measures. It has been written by Digital Commerce 360 in 2019 and it pertains to hospitals. But we love it as the measures are important for companies in any industry. A survey of 100 hospitals by Syft Corp. has found that nearly 50% still rely on manual spreadsheets for their supply chain management. This process is not only time consuming, but also costly. A digital supply chain could help reduce supply-related costs by 18%, or $11 million annually, by reducing errors and increasing order management and inventory control Amid increasing supply chain costs, a survey of 100 hospitals by Syft Corp. finds nearly half of them still rely on manual and spreadsheet supply chain processes that miss out on the cost-efficient benefits of digital operations. Hospitals, which can be very costly to operate and remain perpetually cash-starved, can generate some significant savings by using various forms of newer available digital technologies to automate their supply chains. But while hospitals see a more automated and commerce-enabled supply chain as a priority, many are not committing the time, money and other resources in order to make that happen, says a new survey of 100 hospital executives from healthcare supply chain services provider Syft Corp. A digitally enhanced supply chain system could help a typical hospital cut supply-related costs by nearly 18%, or $11 million annually, through better order management, inventory control and related processes, the Syft report says. For a hospital with $900 million in annual revenue, a 1% gain in that hospital’s operating margin, or the revenues and costs related to patient care, can range from $5 million to $27 million, it says. 52% of hospital executives who responded to the survey say they place a priority on developing a better supply chain that improves their organization’s operating margin by at least 1% is a priority. But many hospitals still use paper, manual processes and outdated technology to operate a supply chain. Proative analysis by case or surgeon For example, 46% of hospitals use internal programs based on manual or spreadsheet processes, the survey found. As a result, those hospitals can’t perform more sophisticated or proactive analyses or drill down by case or surgeon, Syft says. 9% of hospitals in the survey do not track operating margins and 8% said they weren’t aware if or how margins are tracked, Syft says. “Like information technology, managing the supply chain was historically relegated to the basement—largely regarded as an expense rather than as a strategic business imperative that can positively impact margins,” the Syft report says. “But as CEOs’ chief concern shifted from driving more revenue in 2017 to cutting costs in 2018, and as supply chain costs begin surpassing labor costs by 2020, healthcare executives can no longer afford to ignore opportunities to optimize supply chain management.” Other report findings include: 98% of survey respondents say supply management is a moderate-to-high priority, but only 65% and 13%, respectively, see it as a high or highest priority. 66% say reducing waste/costs is their greatest pressure point for better automating and commerce-enabling their supply chain and 97% say supply chain analytics can positively impact costs. 73% of hospitals have used supply chain analytics to find ways to improve quality, but 39% use internally designed software. 18% don’t analyze their supply chain at all, while 16% use their electronic health records system. Only 46% of hospitals say they operate their supply chain very well, compared with 29% moderately well, 20% extremely well, 3% slightly well and 2% not well at all. The top barriers to reducing supply chain waste in the operating room, which account for 66% of the difficulties, are physician and staff resistance to change and lack of time and the right technology. “While the large majority of survey respondents believe SCM can improve costs and care quality, fewer say they’re actually deploying advanced supply chain analytics to take advantage of that potential impact, which presents a major missed opportunity,” says Syft CEO Todd Plesko. “Hospital leaders are going to need to use every tool in their toolbox to succeed, and they will need to turn the supply chain into a strategic business lever—not only to save money, but to improve clinician satisfaction, patient outcomes, and the care patients receive.”
  18. MemberSupport

    The Challenge of M&A

    "Merging two or more organizations is a complex transaction filled with risk", says Protiviti's Merger & Acqusition (M&A) practice. "The best deals deals follow a structured and disciplined approach with clear strategic objectives, comprehensive due diligence, detailed integration plans, and a focus on creating and capturing value. Although such planned approaches may sound simple, history shows many failed M&A attempts that have resulted in significant impacts to shareholder value." We have had several discussions with founding members and we have the belief that our Knowledge Management (KM) repository for Level 2 Private Members which can help C+H value chain organizations to approach M&A wisely and with enough caution to ensure that the venture well founded. This unique database is structured around Protiviti's M&A methodology. We look forward to fleshing this resource out with the help of Level 2 Members and above. In essence, mergers and acquisitions are some of the most powerful and versatile growth tools employed by companies of all sizes and in all industries. A well-timed and well-managed purchase or merger can boost both the short-term and well as the long-term outlook for many organizations. There are many risks that can cause significant loss of shareholder value if a transaction is not conceived and executed carefully and strategically. We look forward to getting your guidance and inputs in our KM repository for M&A best practices!
  19. I have some new news regarding the formation of our Merger and Acquisition (M&A) Knowledge Management (KM) Repository for our Private Tier 2 Business-To-Business (B2B) members. This is an excellent business opportunity to drive even more member value for the tough aspects of M&A transitions and ensuring the your firm has mitigated the risks from beginning to end and thereafter. You will note that our KM database is well-structured using an M&A guide which has been provided by one of the top Governance Risk Compliance (GRC) consultancies and educators; Protiviti, Inc. Our objective is to enable our member organizations to take advantage of Protiviti's expertise in M&A business transformations. When you become a Tier 2 Private member you can access Protiviti's Merger & Acquisition Guide. Just contact us and we will forward it to you. In essence, our KM repository acts as a way to document Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) while allowing members to get detailed feedback on leading (or "best") practices for Cannabis and Hemp (C+H) industry segments where M&A activities are taking place. I, personally, have a strong professional interest in business transformations where an M&A transaction is involved. Business transformation are very tough to pull off, successfully. But with some key Methods, Tools and Training (MTT) your firm will be very well grounded to take on the toughest of tough M&A situations: I. Methods and Methodologies Program Lifecycle Methodology (e.g. Summit-D, Ascendant, etc.) Systems Integration (SI) methodology Human Change Methodology Technology Change Methodology Etc. II. Tools and Technologies Functional Modeling, Process modeling, Simulation Requirements Management Business Rule & Process Management ERP Decision Support Systems (DSS) Etc. III. Education and Training Functional Decomposition Modeling / Enterprise Mapping (IDEF0 methodology) Role-based Flow Diagramming (Rummler Brache methodology) Requirements Engineering Human Change Management Technology Change Management Governance Risk Compliance (GRC) Here's a brief biographical sketch on why M&A is such an important aspect of our organizations. I spent the last 10 years of my career with a boutique consultancy and education firm helping to provide guidance and structured courses spanning Governance Risk Compliance (GRC) topics and practices (including cybersecurity). My clients have mostly been in the internal audit function. I have been lucky because much of my background has been geared to business and enterprise transformations which is another way of saying that I have been in the business re-engineering space. I taught my of my PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) associates on the enterprise integration methodologies which Coopers & Lybrand had excelled at. During the merger of Price Waterhouse and Coopers & Lybrand, I taught a couple of key courses for some of the M&A teams from both companies, which gave me an especially good handle on what M&A teams need during a Merger and Acquisition (M&A) transaction. Check out our Tier 2 KM repository and feel free to jump in to help us address and answer a huge range of tough M&A questions. Phil Wilson, Managing Director
  20. What typically keeps internal audit from being more involved during the M&A effort?
  21. What is a post-acquisition audit?
  22. Can our Internal Audit organization be involved during the integration planning and execution phases?
  23. How can the Internal Audit organization add value for the M&A process, and especially during the due diligence phase?
  24. What role should the Internal Audit organization play during an M&A transaction?
  25. What are the leading best practices that can be leveraged to address sales and marketing functions during an M&A transaction?
  26. What are the types of typical issues that we can anticipate in our sales and marketing functions during an M&A transaction?
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